"Our Town" Opens @ WHS! Finale's Slated For Saturday!!

"Our Town" Opens @ WHS! Finale's Slated For Saturday!!

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 03:29
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Final performances slated for Saturday at 2PM & 7PM! 

ADMISSION: Adults $8, Seniors & Students $5, Kids Under 6 FREE

The "Crusaders of the Stage", under the direction of new drama directors Bob and Michelle Brown, opened Thursday evening at WHS. Well performed and received by those present. Originally scheduled for Friday evening also, that performance was cancelled and moved to Saturday due to Sectional Football action Friday at Sellers Park. The finale's will be performed on Saturday, a matinee at 2PM, and the last performance, 7PM. There's a large cast of characters:

CAST
Stage Manager - Rachel Lee
Doc Gibbs - Jason Jeffery
Mrs. Gibbs - Chloe Easterly
George Gibbs - Austin Harriger
Rebecca Gibbs - Jordyn Young
Mr. Webb - Gabe Hyer
Mrs. Webb - Brenna Brown
Emily Webb - Brittney Bentz
Wally Webb - Jacob Brown
Howie Newsom - Michael Cullens
Mrs. Soames - Michaela Adkins
Simon Stimson - Quinn McCue
Joe Crowell, Jr - Blake Prickett
Simon Crowell - Javan Brown
Sue Crowell - Sarah Brown
Alice Crowell - Sophia Brown
Professor Willard - Mason Lough
Constable Warren - Cameron Carter
Sam Craig - Joel Brown
Joe Stoddard - Mason Lough
Baseball Players / Asst. Stage Mgrs - Joel Brown, Mason Lough, Cameron Carter, Justus Brown
Ladies of the Town - Destiny Pacchelli, Aevrie Martin, Stellar Young, Kelsey Wiens, Katy Kenemore, Elizabeth Rebold, Abby Ward, Callie Wickham, Riley Anderson

CREW
Direction: Bob & Michelle Brown
Stage Managers: Juliette Hyer, Joe Brown
Lights: Katy Kennemore, Carmen Smith, Jordyn Young, Javan Brown
Sound: Maycee Hunter
Costumes: Michelle Brown, Michaela Adkins, Andrea Day (Wellington Community Theater)

Source: WIKIPEDIA

Pulitzer Prize winning, Our Town, celebrates it's 80th anniversary this year, a play about a fictional town in New Hampshire (Grover's Corner) between 1901-1913, written by Thornton Wilder. Our Town was first performed at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, New Jersey in 1938. It later went on to success on Broadway and won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It remains popular today and revivals are frequent. 

Act I: Daily Life

The Stage Manager introduces the audience to the small town of Grover's Corners, New Hampshire, and the people living there as a morning begins in the year 1901. Professor Willard speaks to the audience about the history of the town. Joe Crowell delivers the paper to Doc Gibbs, Howie Newsome delivers the milk, and the Webb and Gibbs households send their children (Emily and George, respectively) off to school on this beautifully simple morning.

Act II: Love and Marriage

Three years have passed, and George and Emily prepare to wed. The day is filled with stress. Howie Newsome is delivering milk in the pouring rain while Si Crowell, younger brother of Joe, laments how George's baseball talents will be squandered. George pays an awkward visit to his soon-to-be in-laws. Here, the Stage Manager interrupts the scene and takes the audience back a year, to the end of Emily and George's junior year. Emily confronts George about his pride, and over an ice cream soda, they discuss the future and their love for each other. George resolves not to go to college, as he had planned, but to work and eventually take over his uncle's farm. In the present, George and Emily say that they are not ready to marry—George to his mother, Emily to her father—but they both calm down and happily go through with the wedding.

Act III: Death and Eternity

Nine years have passed. The Stage Manager opens the act with a lengthy monologue emphasizing eternity, bringing the audience's attention to the cemetery outside of town and the characters who have died since the wedding, including Mrs. Gibbs (pneumonia, while traveling), Wally Webb (burst appendix, while camping), Mrs. Soames, and Simon Stimson (suicide by hanging). Town undertaker Joe Stoddard is introduced, as is a young man named Sam Craig who has returned to Grover's Corners for his cousin's funeral. That cousin is Emily, who died giving birth to her and George's second child. Once the funeral ends, Emily emerges to join the dead; Mrs. Gibbs urges her to forget her life, warning her that being able to see but not interact with her family, all the while knowing what will happen in the future, will cause her too much pain, but she refuses. Ignoring the warnings of Simon, Mrs. Soames, and Mrs. Gibbs, Emily returns to Earth to relive one day, her 12th birthday. Emily watches with joy at being able to see her parents and some of the people of her childhood for the first time in years. However, her joy quickly turns to pain as she realizes how little people appreciate the simple joys of life. The memory proves too painful for her, and she realizes that every moment of life should be treasured. When she asks the Stage Manager if anyone truly understands the value of life while they live it, he responds, "No. The saints and poets, maybe—they do some." Emily returns to her grave next to Mrs. Gibbs and watches impassively as George kneels weeping over her. The Stage Manager concludes the play and wishes the audience a good night.

PROMO VIDEO

"OUR TOWN" PERFORMANCE PICS 110818

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